The little things in life are just that, things.

In this blog post I’m going to write about apps that I love. These are the apps that I can’t live without anymore. I always wanted to write this blog post but never got around to it. But a friend of mine requested it after she saw me using the Alfred app to look for an icon.

Alfred
Alfred

The idea for Alfred is really simple: by hitting a keyboard combination (I use cmd+space), you get a launchbar that lets you “do stuff” on your computer.

The most common things you might do include launching other apps, searching Google, and searching for files. It’s all controlled by the keyboard and possible options appear as you type — so launching “iTunes” often just requires you to type “it” and hit enter. You can also do your own commands.

One that I often use as a UI designer is ”flaticon ___”, that will search for what ever I write on the flaticon website.

 

Bartender
Bartender

Bartender lets you organize your menu bar apps, by hiding them under an icon with three dots. By clicking on it it will display a Bartender’s Bar, there you can rearranging the icons to your liking. This means that all those menu bar icons that you don’t use that much can be hidden there, like the Adobe Updater or the Bluetooth icon.

Yoink
Yoink

Yoink simplifies drag and drop between windows, apps, spaces and fullscreen apps. I use this a lot while using Sketch when I try to get images into the Sketch project. I just start dragging a image from Finder or directly from Safari to Yoinks tiny window at the edge of the screen that appears when you drag something to it.

This frees up your mouse so you can comfortably navigate to the destination of the drop and resume the drag from Yoink’s window. You can also drag in a lot of files into Yoink’s window. This is good when you are searching for stuff that are in different places and will concentrate on finding them first.

Moom

Moom

Moom allows you to easily move and zoom windows. I perfer Moom over the others like it because it has more options. I use it to resize my Sublime window to half to the right side of screen when I drag it to the right edge of the screen, and then I take my Safari window and drag it to the left edge of the screen and then the Safari window resizes itself to half the size of the window and gets placed on the left side of the screen. I also use the top edge to make the window maximes.

You can also hover on the green resize button on the window to get a grid system where you can select how you want you window to be displayed. Once you’ve tried Mooming your windows, you’ll never go back to simply moving and zooming them again.

 

HiddeMe
HiddenMe

HiddenMe has saved my ass a lot of times. You know those times when you need to replace some images on your Keynote presentation just before going up and your desktop looks like a giant mess. HiddenMe sits on your menu bar and when you active it it will hide all your icons. You can achive the same effect with a terminal command but HiddenMe skips the terminal and does it all from your menu bar.

Fantastical
Fantastical

Fantastical is a calander app that sits on your menu bar. What this does is that you can write in a natural-language. For example if I type ”Lunch with Emso on May 3rd at 5pm in Tellus Bar” Fantastical will parse it and place it for you without a fuss. It will even show what happens during that day so that you don’t dubbel book.

Conclusion

Those are just a few apps that I use all the time. For a strange reason I feel more productive while using them, but I don’t know if it’s true. I have a bunch of other apps to share, so if this post does well I’ll write a follow-up.